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Information about liposarcoma, a type of soft tissue sarcoma

Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is a type of cancer that starts in the soft tissues of the body, including the fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and tissues around the joints. More than 50 different types of STS have been identified. Each of these types is named after the kind of soft tissue cell in which the tumor forms. Some of the most common are gastrointestinal stromal tumors (which form in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or small intestine), liposarcoma (which forms in the fat cells), and leiomyosarcoma (which forms in the smooth muscles).

SOFT TISSUE SARCOMA IS A
RELATIVELY RARE TYPE OF CANCER

Although STS is relatively uncommon, there are organizations dedicated to supporting you. These organizations can connect you to people going through similar experiences who may be able to provide guidance and support for you.

Information is also available for your family and friends as they support you through your diagnosis and treatment.

More about the disease

Liposarcoma, also known as adipocytic sarcoma, can occur in the fat cells of any part of the body, but most liposarcoma tumors occur in the thigh, knee, or abdomen.

Depending on the disease stage, liposarcoma can sometimes be treated with surgery. Liposarcoma that cannot be treated with surgery alone or that has spread to other parts of the body is called advanced liposarcoma. Disease that has spread to other parts of the body is still considered liposarcoma because the type of cancer cell remains the same.

Types of liposarcoma

There are different types of liposarcoma. These types are based on how the cancer cells appear under the microscope. They include dedifferentiated, myxoid/round cell, and pleomorphic. Disease characteristics and treatment options vary between the different types of liposarcoma. It is important to speak to your doctor about what treatment options are available based on your type of disease.

Although advanced liposarcoma may not be treatable with surgery, there are still treatment options available. HALAVEN is a treatment option approved to treat certain patients with advanced liposarcoma

Who is HALAVEN® (eribulin mesylate) Injection for?

HALAVEN is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, and who have already received other types of anticancer medicines after the cancer has spread.

HALAVEN is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with liposarcoma that cannot be treated with surgery or that has spread to other parts of the body, and who have received treatment with a certain type of anticancer medicine.

What safety information do I need to know about HALAVEN?

HALAVEN can cause serious side effects, including

  • Low white blood cell count (neutropenia). This can lead to serious infections that could lead to death. Your health care provider will check your blood cell counts. Call your health care provider right away if you develop fever (temperature above 100.5°F), chills, cough, or burning or pain when you urinate, as any of these can be symptoms of infection
  • Numbness, tingling, or pain in your hands or feet (peripheral neuropathy). Peripheral neuropathy is common with HALAVEN and sometimes can be severe. Tell your health care provider if you have new or worsening symptoms of peripheral neuropathy
  • Your health care provider may delay or decrease your dose or stop treatment with HALAVEN if you have side effects

Before you receive HALAVEN, tell your health care provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you

  • have liver or kidney problems
  • have heart problems, including a problem called congenital long QT syndrome
  • have low potassium or low magnesium in your blood
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. HALAVEN can harm your unborn baby. Tell your health care provider right away if you become pregnant or think you are pregnant during treatment with HALAVEN. Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective form of birth control during treatment with HALAVEN and for at least 2 weeks after the final dose of HALAVEN and males should use an effective form of birth control when having sex with female partners who are able to become pregnant during treatment with HALAVEN and for 3½ months (14 weeks) after the final dose of HALAVEN
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if HALAVEN passes into your breast milk. Do not breastfeed during treatment with HALAVEN and for 2 weeks after the final dose of HALAVEN

Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

What are the possible side effects of HALAVEN?

HALAVEN can cause changes in your heartbeat (called QT prolongation). This can cause irregular heartbeats. Your health care provider may do heart monitoring (electrocardiogram or ECG) or blood tests during your treatment with HALAVEN to check for heart problems.

The most common side effects of HALAVEN in adults with breast cancer include low white blood cell count (neutropenia), low red blood cell count (anemia), weakness or tiredness, hair loss (alopecia), nausea, and constipation.

The most common side effects of HALAVEN in adults with liposarcoma include tiredness, nausea, hair loss (alopecia), constipation, stomach pain, and fever.

Your health care provider will do blood tests before and during treatment while you are taking HALAVEN. The most common changes to blood tests in adults with liposarcoma include low white blood cell count (neutropenia) and decreased blood levels of potassium or calcium.

For more information about HALAVEN, please see full Prescribing Information.